SNOW – a photo book by THOMAS FLECHTNER

SNOW

Thomas Flechtner

Snow is a ghostly and elegant white large format photo book. Almost like as if it were frost covered, it’s fresh to the touch, and once inside, it unveils all the soothing and calming power of winter and snow. Which, despite poetries, authors and people’s beliefs, it’s not white. Not at all.

Flechtner’s powerful eye brings snow alive and allows it a chamaleontic range of hues and tones. Pitch black and grayish yellow when at night time the mountain slopes are sulcated by uneven lines of light; bright milky white that blends in a light dirt gray on the threshold of Shangri-La, across the columns reinforced snow wall; mint green and peach orange in the space lit by neon and car lights, between the geometrically disposed houses in Switzerland; light blue melting into gray and ice blue on the patched surface of the frozen North Atlantic Ocean.

Morover, it isn’t simply about the colors. It’s the lines that draw the viewer into the picture, it’s the total human absence which makes every place a lieu: a state of mind.

It took the photographer 6 winters to complete his project, from 1996 till 2001, but the goal is set: the humble snow reveals a previously unknown identity.

Michele Molinari

all images © Thomas Flechtner

Buy Snow.

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FLOPHOUSE – a photo book by HARWEY WANG

FLOPHOUSE

Life on the Bowery

photography by Harvey Wang, text by David Isay and Stacy Abramson

“This book takes you places you don’t want to enter, to people you don’t want to meet, to lives you think you don’t want to live – and makes you rethink all your assumptions. It reveals the tremendous strenght and humanity ot those who are usually ignored. And as you pay attention, your own humanity expands.”

Susan Stamberg, special correspondent, NPR

Flophouse is not a place where you want to live. You might get a Manhattan address for something like 10-15 bucks per night, but it’s not glamorous at all. You’ll be on the Bowery, with no A/C, with bedbugs, with a cubicle as a bedroom and chicken wire up above your head to give you privacy. But you’ll still hear farts, burps and nightmare’s screams from your fellows: the flop mates.

So, why do you want to live in a Flophouse? I don’t really want to go there, but, was it that your lady kicked you out of the shack ‘cause you were drunk all the time, or you couldn’t stand the Midwest any longer and then found that New York fucking City is too much for you, or you want to feel totally free since nobody gives you a damn on the Bowery.

Come, come on here, come to rest on the warm and soft belly of the City, come to where you’ll be yourself, time stands still and life get suspended.

And be nice, pose for the photographer. He’s shooting faces, places. He’s shooting souls throught the eyes, he’s telling your life in a pic, he’s making it rich and interesting. Because, you know, you might be a flop, but you have full hands of humanity to give.

Michele Molinari

all images © Harvey Wang

Buy Flophouse.

AMERICAN NIGHT – a photography book by PAUL GRAHAM

American Night is not about the glamorous gloom of the after hours nor the exhilarating Bright Lights Big City atmosphere. There are no lights involved, but rather a subtle therefore powerful depiction of American society as seen through the eyes of an English-born photographer now living in New York City.

Graham has wandered downtowns and residential areas alike, juxtaposing the sprawling immaculate suburbs of the American West and the rundown rat-infested neighborhoods, transmiting the disparity between social classes, the differences in their quality of life expectations for the future. Instead of focusing on the blatant differences, he develops an elegant idea that goes far beyond the perfectly balanced composition and pinpoint lighting: the selection of less-obvious images that we all encounter daily, almost subconsciously, but that few of us take notice of.

The obvious is a big house with a nice spotless car parked in front, printed in full color like a birthday party picture.

The less obvious is a solitary figure walking along a highway, looking for scraps in a garbage bin or passing by a line of car for sale that he’d never be able to afford to buy, printed like it has been washed, as if to obliterate it from sight.

The only time when solitaries figures are printed in full color, they are is in sharp crude-as-life light situation.

A powerful collection of images that brings together dreams and reality, people with a future and those with only a present.

Michele Molinari

all images @ Paul Graham

 

Buy American Night

Paul Graham has been the recipient of many awards including a Eugene Smith Memorial Followship. His work has been exhibited extensively, including at the MoMA, NY, and the Tate Gallery, London. Previously published books include Troubled Land, New EuropeEmpty Heaven and End of an Age.

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